• Posted on: May 27, 2014 by: CashPerform
    • Q)The Forum of Private Business claims that SCF should not be used as a cover for extending payment terms, as “it is a cost”. But wouldn’t receiving payment – through the SCF scheme – within 10 days rather than 60 mitigate, at least to some extent, the cost of that credit?

    A)The challenge for the ‘corporate’ is to identify the ‘critical suppliers’ and then identify a reasonable discount scheme ….but by company or certainly type of supplier i.e. logistics, marketing etc. This is poorly done by most corporates in my view as they do not value or ‘risk review’ suppliers properly.

    To apply a SCF scheme across the board can hurt the corporate and the SME as the margins of many SME’s are so small they cannot absorb a discount of any sort and if ‘included’ in the scheme they then find margins in the future decline and then go bust leaving the corporate without a critical link in the supply chain.

     

    • Q)Isn’t SCF a good thing for small suppliers, or does it depends on the type of solution and how it is used?

    A)Yes, as stated above PLUS credit is becoming scarce and very expensive per latest B of E reports and very little working capital  funding is coming through to small suppliers from banks.

    These small suppliers are now supported by a multitude of unregulated ‘funders’ from pension schemes to platform providers to crowd funders, to family members, to challenger banks to wealth management schemes….the list is endless but so much RISKIER for corporates to understand.

     

    • Q)Secondly, do you think that negative perceptions surrounding SCF might be hampering wider uptake, making it more difficult for corporates to on-board some suppliers? Are there any other factors at play here?

    A)As you say , wider uptake has ‘stalled’ by the ‘unregulated’ nature of the ‘investors’ to smaller suppliers and corporates are taking risks (hence credit insurance has risen dramatically and is ‘cheap’ compared to pre-crisis 2008.)

    The other factors at play here is the ‘quality of the invoices being used’ for the SCF process. With e-invoicing and other ‘checks’ NOT being implemented by UK business one has to ask the question ‘Is the invoice quality paper or toilet paper?’ In other words can it be validated? Can you ‘risk’ loaning money against it?

    This is reverse factoring abut factoring has specific safeguards that SCF has not yet covered.

    The next cash and credit crisis is just around the corner I am sorry to say as Charlie Bean (deputy Governor of Bank of England) pointed out in his exit speech over the weekend when he forecast interest rates rising sooner rather than later to 3%….six times their current level!!!

    Posted on: May 1, 2014 by: CashPerform

    Quality paper not toilet paper

    Recent experiences have shown several organisations crunching numbers and attempting to make the year-end revenues ‘fit’ through generation of somewhat suspect invoices.

    I say suspect in that the invoices are rushed out the door only to be returned due to:

    a)      Missing vital purchase order information

    b)      Incorrect bank account numbers entered

    c)       VAT calculated improperly

    d)      Customers address incorrectly stated as taken from the wrong database

    e)      Invoice number sequencing duplicated

    These scenarios not only caused a delay in payment but also damaged the reputation of the sales/credit function. Furthermore it has caused some customers to question the professionalism of the company concerned.

    Another repercussion was that two organisations were using the trading platforms of companies providing supply chain finance so now their lending facility has been adversely affected too.

    Posted on: March 11, 2014 by: CashPerform

    Overtrading? Then request more cash?

    With certain sectors and areas of the UK economy growing quite rapidly many businesses will be attempting to satisfy a growing order book without having the financial resources to do so.

    This will result in overtrading as their working capital becomes so stretched that eventually part of the financial supply chain will collapse leaving customers without their goods and services, suppliers without their cash and therefore liquidation could soon be the next course of action.

    So what can you identify in the financial supply chain that acts as an early indicator that cash is becoming scarce?

    Firstly payments of expenses/wages/salaries increase quite rapidly. This can lead to more orders being ‘won’ however to satisfy those orders one might need to commit to placing large supply orders on suppliers who themselves duly ramp up their ordering.

    Because of the terms and conditions of sale and purchase not being ‘measured, monitored or managed’ one might find that payments to suppliers are required before cash is received from customers.

    Then as services deteriorate or goods do not arrive, customers start to withhold payments.

    This is the cash conversion cycle at its ‘breaking point’ and when faced with such scenarios attempting to go to the bank, investors to obtain new funding arrangements could be a recipe for disaster.

    The solutions are numerous and it will be depend upon timing re seasonal markets, possible sector scenarios, attempting to negotiate earlier payment terms from customers, extending payment terms to suppliers, requesting more investment etc.

    Posted on: February 21, 2014 by: CashPerform

    Credit Management and the DSO lagging indicator

    Recently, several credit agencies have elected to reflect their own and quite subjective view on whether a company has a good credit history and by taking other factors into account like suppliers scores they have generated ratings that portray, for example, good or very good credit worthiness.

    The DSO metric assists in an understanding of the tracking of debtors but does it really help to understand the organisations ability to pay its bills or support its customers on a sustainable basis?

    I suggest that one requires a narrative that explains how sales are generated, why cash may fluctuate and a fuller appreciation of the commercial terms of the business.

    Posted on: November 1, 2013 by: CashPerform

    Customer Name: xxxxx

    Customer Industry:  Logistics and major European Parcel Carrier

    Year of Training Delivery: 2009- 2013

    Target Audience: Depends upon business unit of xxxx but make up has included:

    Financial Controllers, credit managers, supplier/procurement directors, depot/branch managers, reporting accountants, systems architects, logistics directors.

    Recent audiences have included European directors with a strategy driven by working capital management.

    Business Issue: Being a Blue Chip European Corporate shareholder value through sustainable cash flow was/is key. They required narrative, action plans that reflected the actions being taken to address shortfall in pensions, VAT issues, purchase of new aeroplanes, opening up of new routes, managing major customers like the NHS.

    The narrative was included in their Interim Management Statements and in the letter to Shareholders and reflects the work we have done. These are available on their web site.

    Solution:

    Culture change regarding payment to suppliers.  Payment in full on agreed timescales.

    Evidence based cash conversion cycles for contracts reviewed and actioned regularly

    Cash collection delivered by pre-emptive work by credit control and sales with the customers

    Strategy regarding systems implementation

    Generation of monthly working capital reports that reflected KPI/KRI  and identification of liquidity gaps and funding chasms.

    Outcome: Banking arrangement renewed. New loans funded.

    Banks and markets reassured of credible robust cash flows through efficiency improvements in working capital particularly receivables and payables.

    Share price steadily improving.